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Thread: Interview Tips!

  1. #21
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Thank you so much guys.

    I'll definitely set up my LinkedIn profile. I'll have it as my professional graduation picture for now until I get professional photos done.

    Also things are looking promising with the interview I had the other day... Recruiter said they really liked me and they are bouncing backwards and forwards with salaries. So fingers crossed :)

  2. #22
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Also do you think you should disclose dyslexia in a first interview?

    Dyslexia is not something I see as an issue. It's not prevented me with obtaining degrees or within work. Same with many other people in this day and age.

    The first interview prior to this thread involved a mini exam. It was based on spotting out spelling mistakes and general literacy.

    I did not diclose my dyslexia and therefore did not get extra time. As I felt it would be an unfair advantage to other canidates.

    Plus why would an employer want to take someone on who needs extra time to complete tasks.

    I am not going to lie I did struggle as I heavily rely on spell check... Who doesn't?

    I know there is laws in place to prevent discrimination in the work place.

    But during the interview stage when there is a mini-exam would you feel it's too soon to mention learning difficulties?

    I know you guys on here have fell victim to my waffling as I struggle to get to the point in written form. Hence the long threads and posts. I know it's there as an issue but never got in the way of academia or work to be fair.

    Thoughts on this would be great :)

  3. #23
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    Yikes! No! Never depict yourself as victim or as incompetent. Review The Equality Act and all the specifics. Why run out of the gate with this before ever getting a job and create a problem if there is none? Are you sure you want a job? Save the drama for your personal life.

    Don't ask for special treatment or an accommodation for a disability, if you don't need it. If dyslexia precludes you from doing your job, you shouldn't be applying for it. It's not as though they won't accommodate wheelchairs or other medical, physical or mental disabilities.
    Originally Posted by Jellybean9
    Also do you think you should disclose dyslexia in a first interview?

  4. #24
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    Originally Posted by Wiseman2
    Yikes! No! Never depict yourself as victim or as incompetent. Review The Equality Act and all the specifics. Why run out of the gate with this before ever getting a job and create a problem if there is none? Are you sure you want a job? Save the drama for your personal life.

    Don't ask for special treatment or an accommodation for a disability, if you don't need it. If dyslexia precludes you from doing your job, you shouldn't be applying for it. It's not as though they won't accommodate wheelchairs or other medical, physical or mental disabilities.
    Agree completely! If a job for which you are applying requires you to do things that are made more difficult by your dyslexia, then look for other jobs. I'm not saying that to be harsh; I'm saying it to try and help you find a job that you will not only like, but that you can be good at, so that you will enjoy your employment.

    My ex-husband had dyslexia, and even as an adult, he saw his numbers backwards, etc. He never mentioned this to anyone (other than me, or his teachers), and he was very successful in his career. So I'm not trying to dyslexia-shame you, lol.

    You do not want to start off by painting yourself as a victim who requires special treatment. Industries are small, and word can get around to other companies, who will then not want to interview you at all.
    Last edited by LHGirl; 11-17-2018 at 08:03 AM.

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  6. #25
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    Originally Posted by Jellybean9
    Thank you so much guys.

    I'll definitely set up my LinkedIn profile. I'll have it as my professional graduation picture for now until I get professional photos done.

    Also things are looking promising with the interview I had the other day... Recruiter said they really liked me and they are bouncing backwards and forwards with salaries. So fingers crossed :)
    This is all great news!

    Even if you land this job (which I hope you do!), update your LinkedIn profile. Add this new job to it, and update once you have some proven skills under your belt.

    As for your photo, it does not have to be professionally taken, which can cost a lot. You can have a friend take some headshots of you, against a plain background, with decent lighting (lighting is in front of you, not behind). You can wear a business suit, or a professional top, small earrings (like pearl studs), and minimal makeup and freshly styled hair.

    Update your photo every few years, too. It amazes me how many people I see who have 10 year-old LinkedIn photos. No different than the dating sites, lol!

  7. #26
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by LHGirl
    Agree completely! If a job for which you are applying requires you to do things that are made more difficult by your dyslexia, then look for other jobs. I'm not saying that to be harsh; I'm saying it to try and help you find a job that you will not only like, but that you can be good at, so that you will enjoy your employment.

    My ex-husband had dyslexia, and even as an adult, he saw his numbers backwards, etc. He never mentioned this to anyone (other than me, or his teachers), and he was very successful in his career. So I'm not trying to dyslexia-shame you, lol.

    You do not want to start off by painting yourself as a victim who requires special treatment. Industries are small, and word can get around to other companies, who will then not want to interview you at all.
    I totally agree I have never disclosed it as I have never felt the need to. It has never created an issue in previous or current employment.

    A lot of job applications actually ask outright on the forms if you have a disability (including learning disability). Sometimes they use dyslexia as an example. I just ignore it. As I know they can't discriminate against it but I know they would rather hire someone who can hit the ground running.

    The only thing that threw me as I've interviewed for this role in the past and currently work successfully within the same sector. They chucked in a "mini-exam" in the interview. By time I read through it carefully to understand it I felt like I didn't have enough time.

    I was only diagnosed mid-way through my degree. It never posed a great issue during my Bachelor's but I noticed a massive difference in my exam performance for the slightly bit of extra time rewarded to those with dyslexia. So in situations where I'm having to be examined just was curious if I should mention. But you guys are right. Why highlight something that is not really a problem.

    I'll just accept interviews with exams aren't my "thing".

  8. #27
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by LHGirl
    This is all great news!

    Even if you land this job (which I hope you do!), update your LinkedIn profile. Add this new job to it, and update once you have some proven skills under your belt.

    As for your photo, it does not have to be professionally taken, which can cost a lot. You can have a friend take some headshots of you, against a plain background, with decent lighting (lighting is in front of you, not behind). You can wear a business suit, or a professional top, small earrings (like pearl studs), and minimal makeup and freshly styled hair.

    Update your photo every few years, too. It amazes me how many people I see who have 10 year-old LinkedIn photos. No different than the dating sites, lol!
    I know you wasn't dyslexia shaming in your last post :). Just really appreciate the feedback.

    Also thank you for the tips with the photo! I will get this done tomorrow and have my LinkedIn profile up and running.

  9. #28
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    Awesome! I think with your great attitude and intelligence, plus your openness to feedback, you'll have no trouble landing a job you enjoy.

    You sound like a smart gal with success in your future. :)

  10. #29
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by LHGirl
    Awesome! I think with your great attitude and intelligence, plus your openness to feedback, you'll have no trouble landing a job you enjoy.

    You sound like a smart gal with success in your future. :)
    Aww thank you so much for that!

    Honestly this place has been amazing since discovering it :)

  11. #30
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    I'm kind of on the fence about disclosing the dyslexia.

    I'll tell you why. My department is in charge of training all employees in their work functions. We are required to use written training materials; it is spelled out very clearly in the training regulations. A new employee had been hired in the department and I was tasked with training him. Every single shift I had to retrain him on everything we'd gone over the previous day. After about the 4th time training on the exact same things I became frustrated because our time to get the training done has limits. So I said "X sent an email with detailed instructions how to do this task. You just need to follow the instructions on the email!" And he put his head down and said it a low voice "I can't follow written instructions. The only way I can learn is if someone shows me."

    It would have been very helpful it he'd disclosed this because number one, he could have been accommodated and number two, I wouldn't have lost my temper with him! I felt bad, but he really needed to tell someone rather than wait until the staff reached the point of frustration.

    I don't know, maybe the next time you are given an exam you can say "I am dyslexic, so I may need an extra minute or two if that is allowed".

    Also, be aware that if you are hired and disclose after hiring, the company can say you lied on your application which for many companies is grounds for termination.

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