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Thread: Interview Tips!

  1. #11
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    Ask:

    What is the team like that I'd be working with?
    Where does the company see themselves in 5 years?
    What is the target audience or customer for the company?

    Will training be hands-on and guided?

    Am I an addition to the team or am I replacing someone?


    Do not ask about salary or benefits unless they ask what you want first.

  2. #12
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Thank you so much guys!!!

    Yes didn't think that about the benefits. I know Salary is a big no no. So would never mention it. But I can see how benifits is also a little presumptious like salary "talk".

    In my current role I deal with company benifits so asked about it in my last interview for the first time ever! As like I said I had no idea what to ask them at the end of the interview when they asked me for questions.

    Now I can take all your tips on bored and steer away from the benifits chat.

    Thanks a lot guys. I'm very rusty with interviewing so this has been a great help.

    I'll keep you posted :)

  3. #13
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    The best approach is reading up on the position/company as much as possible. There are endless tools to help you calculate the average salaries for that particular job and very easy to research what benefits a company offers.

    Hopefully your social media is very private and very cleaned up. Remove all goofy or suggestive or questionable posts or photos. Carefully review the privacy settings on all accounts.

    Make sure you have a decent, neutral email address. Don't use a fun or social email address for professional correspondence. Be prompt in all communication. Depending on the position and company culture, dress right for the interview. There are plenty of books and resources for that as well.

    As you know, it's routine now to research applicants' social media and most companies have software for that as well as other background checks. In this day and age googling yourself is essential.

    The best thing you can do is have a LinkedIn profile with a professional looking head shot and a well written description of your education and experience. Make the LinkedIn profile public so that pops up on searches.

    The gist of any interview should be what you have to offer them, not what's in it for you.
    Last edited by Wiseman2; 11-15-2018 at 08:49 AM.

  4. #14
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    Originally Posted by tattoobunnie
    Ask:

    What is the team like that I'd be working with?
    Where does the company see themselves in 5 years?
    What is the target audience or customer for the company?

    Will training be hands-on and guided?

    Am I an addition to the team or am I replacing someone?


    Do not ask about salary or benefits unless they ask what you want first.
    ^^ These are also great questions. And also, great advice to not ask about salary or benefits unless they bring it up.

    Due to a lot of restructuring/mergers/acquisitions, I've had quite a lot of interview experience. I've never gone on an interview where I wasn't offered the job.

    I also completely changed careers, and was as shocked as anyone that I landed the job I currently have. I've followed all the good advice here, plus the info I gave earlier about researching the company and asking about them.

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  6. #15
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    Originally Posted by Wiseman2
    The gist of any interview should be what you have to offer them, not what's in it for you.
    Yes, I want to emphasize this point. Even if you are asked about your own goals, I would keep this in mind. A recruiter of mine gave me great advice once, which was to not tell the interviewer your goals but instead ask about the company's goals. More often than not, your personal goals in the company will not align with the company's goals.

    The best way to answer their question is to turn it around and ask more about the company's goals. My recruiter told me to use him as a scapegoat; that he said the company was "insert positive traits here" and it sounds like traits in the company you want, and you would love to hear more about and help achieve the company's goals. It shows interest by indirectly answering the question, without the handicap of listing your goals that may or may not align with the company's goals.

  7. #16
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
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    I would research the company in advance, read any news articles so you know what new product or service they are offering. During the interview, I asked my now manager what he liked most about working for the company. For another interview with a different company where I was hired for a project, I asked what were the "goalposts" they wanted to hit in the first 3 months and then 6 months.

  8. #17
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Hi All,

    Thank you so much for all your advice!

    I had an interview yesterday. Feel it went reasonably well.

    I took a lot of your advice on board.

    Unfortunately we did go over the hour and I felt like asking to view the facilities would have been a bit much as we went over the allocated time. Would have really liked to of done this as the office looked amazing and I would have liked to see the rest of the team.

    They were impressed with the questions I asked about the company and the rearch into current affairs of the sector I'm involved.

    It felt way more relaxed and less like an interview and more like a "conversation".

    So unlike the first interview I had that lead me to ask for advice on here it went a lot better. So when they asked if I had any questions... I had tonnes. So thank you so much guys!

    I really tried to let them see what I had to offer them and not what they could offer me. I thankfully made no questions on company benifits.

    Thankfully I'm a very private person so nothing awful is online of me. I'm very anti-social media. So that saves me.

    Moving forward do you all think it is vital to have a LinkedIn profile? As all that information is on a resemé/curriculum vitae?

    I will keep you guys posted on the outcome of this.

    It has definitely given me more confidence moving forward to more interviews in the future :)

  9. #18
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    I have a LinkedIn profile. I have had some companies reach out to me after seeing my profile, as well as my profile on Indeed.com.

    I agree with the person who said to be aware of any cutsey or potentially embarrassing email addresses or profile names. One person who was recently added temporarily to the recruiting staff at my company asked me to print her a label to put on her supplies cart (my department provides these). The name she wanted? "Babydoll". I'm not even kidding. It's likely she will not be offered a permanent position because she made herself look silly.

  10. #19
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Guess I will reopen my profile. I only ever bad it as a student as I was in the science feild. I know it's great for contacts within those sort of sectors. Guess didn't think for my current role. Will look into this.

    The only professional photos I have are from like a "model" shoot bought as a gift. So not idea. Then my passport photo... Would a passport photo be a bit too serious?

    I was very fortunate with my email. It's just my full name so that's lucky I managed to get it before it became unavailable.

    I worked in recruitment. Some of the emails were very childish. I'm surprised no one have told these people before. There is quirky and then there is just down right unprofessional!

    Can't get over "babydoll". Honestly how could she think she could get anywhere in the real world with that.

    Thanks for the advice :)

  11. #20
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    Yes, you need a LinkedIn profile. It shocks me how many people who are either unhappy in their current jobs, or are actively looking, do not have it.

    LinkedIn isn't "social media". It's professional media.

    I recently hired a professional photographer to take actual, professional headshots, and I agree on having a professional-sounding email name (Babydoll....kills me, lol).

    Connect with tons of people on LinkedIn. You'll be amazed at how many recruiters and job searchers will contact you.

    View other profiles on LinkedIn, and see how people worded their profiles. Add in your experience, your education, etc. In short, treat it like a resume snapshot.

    Good luck on the recent interview!

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