Facebook share
LinkedIn share
Google plus share
Twitter plus share
Give Advice
Ask For Advice
Page 1 of 10 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 91

Thread: Taking negative customer feedback

  1. #1
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Age
    38
    Posts
    46,892

    Taking negative customer feedback

    Hi all - this is a vent/request for general advice. This year, I started working for a company. For simplicity, let's say they make catapults. I am not on the catapult sales team, but after the customer buys a catapult, I go and teach them how to use it and if there are problems with its use, I try to troubleshoot (is it something that the customer is doing wrong or is the catapult broken?) Today, my coworker told me that the sales guy made a new catapult sale at High Garden, but then the new customer (I'll call her Sansa) said that she used to work at another company (River Run) and when I performed a training there, it was terrible, I didn't know what I was talking about, and that I'm an idiot and I was on my phone the whole time. I was very confused to hear that because I have no clue who Sansa is and while I was at River Run recently, it was for a more technical reason (catapult installation inspection) and I didn't give any trainings, I didn't interact with Sansa, I only worked with Arya for a few questions. I was on my phone replying to emails while I was waiting for the engineers to complete the installation. To be honest, Arya was a pain in the butt as a customer, nothing was quite good enough, even though I was trying to explain that the catapult was set up perfectly. To appease her, I even provided free (expensive!) materials so she could test that the catapult worked and I followed up with her and she confirmed it worked fine. I also told my manager that Arya was a pain to work with.

    So I have a phone call tomorrow with the sales guy to try to straighten this out. I seriously don't even know who Sansa is, but apparently she thinks I'm an idiot and don't know what I'm talking about, and now I need to teach her how to use the catapult? My coworker can cover for me, but he is already slammed with work and I live much closer than he does to High Garden. It sounds like Arya bad-mouthed me to Sansa and now I can either pass this off to my coworker, or go in and hope that Sansa has an open mind about my skills.

    Help?!

  2. #2
    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Central Canada
    Posts
    12,258
    Gender
    Female
    Winter is coming!

    I can't help you but whatever you do, make sure you take some dragon glass into that meeting with you.

    May the Seven Gods both new and old be with you, Annie.

  3. #3
    Bronze Member dundermiflin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Age
    39
    Posts
    292
    Gender
    Female
    So the idiot is probably Arya, who maybe worked for Sansa and blamed you when she couldn't make sense of the catapult? I think what you do depends on how confident you are in your understanding of the catapult and any questions about the catapult. If you think you got it down and Sansa is not requesting someone else, then maybe go reclaim your reputation? And turn your phone off during the question/answer session.

  4. #4
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    2,255
    OK I got confused with all the obvious changed names, but here's my advice.

    First of all, I'm in a sales position, and I work with people such as yourself, who help with the training. So I do sort of understand the situation.

    You have a phone call with the sales guy tomorrow, and how to approach it?

    I sell a group of products that is highly technical and has extremely specific user instructions. As in, certain things have to occur for a certain number of seconds. Ten extra seconds can cause failure; 5 seconds too few can cause failure. Many times, my "customer" simply needs more guidance as to product usage. These are not idiots who can't get it right, as I look at is as my job to explain it properly.

    Here's what not to do: Bash the customer. Never ever ever complain about a customer to your company. I don't care how much of a pain any of your customers are; unless they are asking things that are illegal, unethical, or immoral, you should never talk bad about them. They are the ones buying "catapults"; they are the reason you all have jobs.

    Approach it from a place of curiosity. Simply ask questions. Listen to the answers. Listen to the sales guy. Don't get defensive. Don't deflect by placing blame on the customer.

    Know what? It irritates me to no end when someone is trying to do business with me, but they are on their phone. I don't care if they're waiting, answering emails, or whatever. You are there to do a job for them. Be present. Turn your d*mn phone off and put it in your bag. Rant over about that.

    You will never lose by asking questions and listening to the answers. Don't listen and just wait for your turn to respond. If possible, say nothing, but absorb the responses.

  5.  

  6. #5
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,813
    Gender
    Female
    When it comes to some customers, sometimes they can never be pleased or happy.

    Is the co-worker you're speaking with tomorrow a reasonable person? Maybe you'll have a better idea of what to do once you speak with him and hash out what happened and what was said.

    If your co-worker goes to High Ground instead, or if you go and Sansa complains, can this affect your job in any way?

    I'm hoping it's you that attends High Garden, though. Don't let these customers push you around.

    You know what you're doing, so I'd go to High Garden, play dumb in terms of what you heard they said about you (act as if you didn't hear anything at all), be friendly, professional, and do your thing.

    Just whatever you do, and regardless of how much what they said irks you, take the high road.

    You can't please everyone and sometimes people will find anything and everything to b**** about.

    Good luck, Annie!

  7. #6
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Age
    38
    Posts
    46,892
    Thanks LHGirl for that perspective. I see where you are coming from. From my point of view, I was there as a "help" for the engineers and not engaged in a customer training session, so I tried to keep myself occupied. This situation was also a little different than usual because it was the end of quarter and for the revenue recognition, the timeline had to be hurried up (hence why I was sitting around waiting for a few hours for the engineers to finish, rather than coming in on another day.) But in the future, I can definitely watch how much I am pulling out my phone. But because of the nature of my job, most of my work is done through work/email. Other customers are contacting me all the time with their other questions.

    I'm a bit frustrated and confused because the sales guy also came to my co-worker instead to me directly (he knows my coworker better than me), so I have this third-hand story that i've tried to piece together. When he said that Sansa used to work at River Run and said that I did a bad job at that training, I was very confused because 1) I have no record of meeting Sansa, and 2) I didn't do a training at River Run. Sansa said in front of her boss that she didn't want to pay us for the catapult, because although we shipped it and installed it, she wasn't sure if it would work with the things she was planning to throw. This was a very awkward conversation for me because we shipped the product, we installed it, I showed it worked, but not to her liking. :/ And it being the end of quarter, there was a lot of pressure on me to get the signature by the end of the day.

    On Sansa's end, their previous catapult they purchased with us works, but it had a lot of technical problems this year and it needed to be fixed multiple times, so I am sure they are hyper-sensitive to anything going wrong on the new one.

    Dundermifflin - I definitely know my stuff. I literally have a PhD in catapults, so I am very confident. Now, I definitely don't know everything and i will gladly admit that and if I don't know an answer for a customer, I will go look it up, or refer them to a more knowledgeable coworker.

  8. #7
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Age
    38
    Posts
    46,892
    Originally Posted by milly007
    When it comes to some customers, sometimes they can never be pleased or happy.

    Is the co-worker you're speaking with tomorrow a reasonable person? Maybe you'll have a better idea of what to do once you speak with him and hash out what happened and what was said.

    If your co-worker goes to High Ground instead, or if you go and Sansa complains, can this affect your job in any way?

    I'm hoping it's you that attends High Garden, though. Don't let these customers push you around.

    You know what you're doing, so I'd go to High Garden, play dumb in terms of what you heard they said about you (act as if you didn't hear anything at all), be friendly, professional, and do your thing.

    Just whatever you do, and regardless of how much what they said irks you, take the high road.

    You can't please everyone and sometimes people will find anything and everything to b**** about.

    Good luck, Annie!
    If my coworker goes to High Garden instead of me, we would have to tell our boss why. I think that an accumulation of complaints would catch his notice. Our company prides itself on good customer service and we take negative comments seriously. I am actually going out to an account next week because the customer is unhappy with some of the service they have received and I've been asked to go meet with them in person and try to figure out what is going on.

    If I go to High Garden, I will definitely be polite and pleasant and give them a good training, and hopefully they would realize that Sansa's assessment of me was incorrect.

    I went to my company's customer service training and we talked about handling customer complaints, I should go back and read, but this is kind of one of the situations that's frustrating because I've kind of had to piece together what the situation is. It's not like it's something super obvious to me.

  9. #8
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Age
    38
    Posts
    46,892
    I sell a group of products that is highly technical and has extremely specific user instructions. As in, certain things have to occur for a certain number of seconds. Ten extra seconds can cause failure; 5 seconds too few can cause failure. Many times, my "customer" simply needs more guidance as to product usage. These are not idiots who can't get it right, as I look at is as my job to explain it properly.
    I certainly don't think that they are idiots. I know that they are experts at what they do, and I hope that they would recognize that in me as well, but it sounds like I didn't make that impression? I definitely was not there treating them like idiots. But it got a bit frustrating when I was trying to explain to them that the product worked as promised from our end and that the results were extremely good. And they were like, "yeah, but will it work with our purpose?" That's when I sent them the extra materials for free so they could test it themselves. But how many other products in life do you not pay for until you like the results? Officially, we sell materials based on what we promise, we can't sell things based on what they have in their mind.

  10. #9
    Platinum Member melancholy123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    5,176
    Gender
    Female
    Maybe the one who thinks you are an idiot doesnt actually know who you are, perhaps she mistook you for another person.

  11. #10
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Age
    38
    Posts
    46,892
    Originally Posted by melancholy123
    Maybe the one who thinks you are an idiot doesnt actually know who you are, perhaps she mistook you for another person.
    Yeah, that will be a conversation I will have with the sales guy tomorrow. My coworker told me that he was confused when the sales guy told him the complaint because he was like, "Annie didn't perform a training at River Run." Then my coworker showed me the name of the person who complained, and I had no idea who that was, so it really took a while to try to piece it together? I guess I will know tomorrow and we can figure out how to fix it. They didn't know my name either, they just said, "The girl who was here last month."

Page 1 of 10 1234 ... LastLast

Give Advice
Ask For Advice

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •