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Thread: Taking negative customer feedback

  1. #21
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    Originally Posted by annie24
    yeah, he is dealing with that himself right now and our boss might have to get involved - a customer was having a problem and he suggested they change 6 things. And now things are working and the customer wants to know why it is working now and he doesn't have a really good answer for them and the customer is not ok with that as an answer. I understand the customer's perspective - they want to prevent a similar problem in the future. From my coworker's perspective, he's not watching them 40 hours a week so he can't always pinpoint what they did right this time because they took all 6 of his suggestions.
    Hmmmm, you'd think the customer would know how they fixed the problem if they applied your coworker's six suggestions.

    Man, dealing with customers can be so draining. You're trying to do your job, appease your employer, and ensure that the customer's needs are being met, and they don't always have realistic expectations, and think that their matter is the ONLY matter that you have on your plate.

    I've found that, as long as your employer and coworkers are understanding in terms of how unreasonable some people can be, it does relieve a lot of stress.

  2. #22
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by milly007
    Hmmmm, you'd think the customer would know how they fixed the problem if they applied your coworker's six suggestions.

    Man, dealing with customers can be so draining. You're trying to do your job, appease your employer, and ensure that the customer's needs are being met, and they don't always have realistic expectations, and think that their matter is the ONLY matter that you have on your plate.

    I've found that, as long as your employer and coworkers are understanding in terms of how unreasonable some people can be, it does relieve a lot of stress.
    I guess they are wondering which one of the 6 suggestions did the trick? As true scientists, they should have done one change at a time, but that would cost unnecessary amounts of money and time.

    River Run is known in our company to be difficult, so I guess in a sense, getting negative feedback from them isn't as bad as getting it from some of our nicer customers because then it would be like, "wow, you must have really done something wrong to tick them off." Some customers are easy going even when everything is on fire and I am wondering why they are not yelling at us, and then others, if the some tiny little thing is wrong, (or their results are good and they don't know why), they will complain.

    I'm still learning how to navigate these things - this is my first job out of academia, and things are very different in industry.
    Last edited by annie24; 10-17-2018 at 01:45 AM.

  3. #23
    Platinum Member j.man's Avatar
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    Tell em j.man said to **** off. No exceptions.

  4. #24
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    Just do what you do in the most professional competent manner you usually deliver. Don't kiss this customers butt or treat the situation any differently than the usual excellent service you provide. Don't avoid this customer. Ignore the cranks and gossips. Who cares? Some people will always be unhappy or dense or nasty.
    Originally Posted by annie24
    now I can either pass this off to my coworker, or go in and hope that Sansa has an open mind about my skills.

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  6. #25
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
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    I had a phone call with the sales guy and my coworker this afternoon. The sales guy told me what Sansa told him and I told the sales guy what happened when I was at River Run last week. Sansa specifically asked that I do not lead the training. The sales guy said he wanted to talk to me directly about it, instead of my manager, because many years ago, when he had my job (but at a different company), he was almost fired over a similar misunderstanding. Yeah, so basically, Sansa's impression of me was that she does not want me to do her training because she thought I didn't know what I was talking about and I was always on my phone. I told the sales guy what happened and he said he understood but sometimes these things happen (misunderstanding/perceptions/etc). I told him I never even spoke with Sansa, I only spoke with her colleague Arya, but I explained the entire situation. We decided that when Sansa needs training at her new job at High Garden, both my coworker and I will go in and he will lead the training and I will hang out in the background and add in my expertise and experience when I can (and keep the phone strictly away!) I asked if I should tell my manager anyway about what happened, they said no, the sales guy strongly said no, because this can be a serious offense so best to handle it quietly. So, this makes sense to me. The sales guy thinks that it will blow over soon. I was wondering what happens if they have a question and I need to go in 3 months. He said that I should take my coworker with me again, to protect myself, so that there is a witness if they try to go to my manager with a complaint.

  7. #26
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    It sounds like you work with a great group, Annie.

    They’ve been there, done that, so they can definitely relate.

    Sounds like they have your back.

    Can’t imagine working anywhere where this kind of support didn’t exist.

  8. #27
    Super Moderator annie24's Avatar
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    They are a great group. I recently got some praise for some work I did on some other difficult situations from my managers. But I certainly don't want negative comments to pile up in my records either. :/

  9. #28
    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by annie24
    My coworker told me not to feel badly and not to take it personally - he said some customers will always be unhappy no matter what, and others will think you are awesome and amazing even when you didn't do a great job.
    ^^^ True

    Originally Posted by shellyf62
    I was going to suggest you take Jon Snow along for moral support, but then I remembered he knows nothing
    ... lol ...

  10. #29
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    Sounds like the woman you actually dealt with was in over her head and used you as a scapegoat. That kind of stuff tends to reveal itself over time, but I'm glad your sales guy recognizes this and is handling it discreetly.

    Head high, we're in your corner.

  11. #30
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    Originally Posted by annie24
    I had a phone call with the sales guy and my coworker this afternoon. The sales guy told me what Sansa told him and I told the sales guy what happened when I was at River Run last week. Sansa specifically asked that I do not lead the training. The sales guy said he wanted to talk to me directly about it, instead of my manager, because many years ago, when he had my job (but at a different company), he was almost fired over a similar misunderstanding. Yeah, so basically, Sansa's impression of me was that she does not want me to do her training because she thought I didn't know what I was talking about and I was always on my phone. I told the sales guy what happened and he said he understood but sometimes these things happen (misunderstanding/perceptions/etc). I told him I never even spoke with Sansa, I only spoke with her colleague Arya, but I explained the entire situation. We decided that when Sansa needs training at her new job at High Garden, both my coworker and I will go in and he will lead the training and I will hang out in the background and add in my expertise and experience when I can (and keep the phone strictly away!) I asked if I should tell my manager anyway about what happened, they said no, the sales guy strongly said no, because this can be a serious offense so best to handle it quietly. So, this makes sense to me. The sales guy thinks that it will blow over soon. I was wondering what happens if they have a question and I need to go in 3 months. He said that I should take my coworker with me again, to protect myself, so that there is a witness if they try to go to my manager with a complaint.
    Ugh. I am later to this thread and sorry you had to go through this!! I am glad sales guy is in your corner. I am, too. Feel free to PM.

    On the phone thing . I get it especially since you are trying to communicate about WORK for goodness sake. What I thought was -if you are waiting around any way you can ask to use an empty office or cubicle so you can be on your phone out of sight?

    I hope it blows over too. My suggestion -as much as possible keep the what ifs off your radar -if they need more training for all you know Sassy Sansa will no longer be there!

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