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Thread: Cat allergic husband - any tips to make cohabitation easier

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    Gold Member kuteknish's Avatar
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    Cat allergic husband - any tips to make cohabitation easier

    My husband is allergic to cats. We have always kept my cat in a separate room or garage until June 2018 when we moved to our new home. We have two air purifiers with HEPA filters, and I clean the hair on furniture daily and vacuum every other day. I wipe her down with a dander remover cloth I got at petco once a day.. We have an upholstered couch which I know holds dander more than leather, but we donít have the $ to buy a new couch. We also keep the bedroom door closed at all times.

    It has been good up until two weeks ago when my husband started sneezing 3x as much as before ..
    Are there any other tips anyone can share that have helped their allergic owners live in the same place? Thank you!

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    I'm extremely allergic to cats, and I hate to say this, but I simply could not live in the same house as one.

    No amount of filters, antihistamines, or vacuums will do much.

    The allergist told me it's actually an allergy to the cat's saliva.

    Since cats lick themselves, they leave their saliva everywhere they go, and there is virtually no way to get rid of it. It's even on the walls.

    Even if you bought all new furniture, it would be on the new furniture very soon. It would even be on the backs and sides of the furniture. A home with cats literally has saliva coated throughout.

    The symptoms are, for me, so awful, that I can't even visit a home with cats. The hives and trouble breathing are one thing; the whites of my eyes actually swell up over my irises. The last time I was in a home with cats, it triggered a 2-month long horrendous coughing fit, as it encouraged lung production of eosinophils, which are impossible to get rid of.

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    Gold Member kuteknish's Avatar
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    LHgirl Iím sorry to hear you have such a severe allergy. My husband is more intolerant than allergic.

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    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
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    I'm surprised that you would have a cat when you know your husband can't tolerate them? As LHGirl has said, there isn't really anything you can do to get rid of the dander or the saliva. My husband is allergic as well and as much as both of us like cats, there is no good reason for us to have one and put him through his sneezing attacks or worse.

    What pleasure are you (or your cat) getting out of keeping a pet in the garage or locked up in a separate room?

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    Twice in your original post, you mentioned your husband being allergic:

    Originally Posted by kuteknish
    My husband is allergic to cats.

    Are there any other tips anyone can share that have helped their allergic owners live in the same place? Thank you!

    But in your response to me below, he is now intolerant vs. allergic? Which is it?

    Originally Posted by kuteknish
    LHgirl Iím sorry to hear you have such a severe allergy. My husband is more intolerant than allergic.

    I'd like to clarify this, because intolerant and allergic are two very different things.

    I personally do not like cats. However, if I was not allergic, and my SO had a cat, I'd learn to live with it, and hopefully learn to love it. I cannot live with it due to my allergies, but that is very different to one being intolerant.

    I was once in a relationship with a guy who had 2 cats that he loved dearly, which is what drove me to the allergist in the first place. I'd never in a million years make him get rid of his cats, but despite all the Rx stuff the doctor gave me, I wouldn't have been able to live with them. We never got that far, but it's a tough decision.

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    Gold Member kuteknish's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by ThatwasThen
    I'm surprised that you would have a cat when you know your husband can't tolerate them? As LHGirl has said, there isn't really anything you can do to get rid of the dander or the saliva. My husband is allergic as well and as much as both of us like cats, there is no good reason for us to have one and put him through his sneezing attacks or worse.

    What pleasure are you (or your cat) getting out of keeping a pet in the garage or locked up in a separate room?
    Wow guys, Iím not looking to be judged here, and Iím shocked that I am...
    My cat is 14, and my husband and I have been together 3 years... should I have just given my senior cat away to a shelter instead because he is sensitive to her? Is that what you would have done? Having her with us, but in an area that my husband didnít frequent was a great compromise, and was discussed by both of us, just as it was when we moved here. He knew there was a chance of discomfort but he know how much I love my pet and we are figuring out what other modifications or purchases we could make.
    The area is she was in at our old house actually was fun for her.. we built a cat playhouse with lots of levels and there was a huge window that we put bird feeders outside of so she had a lot of viewing activity. Iíd play with her multiple times a day and had a desk set up too so I could do work in there when I was home.

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    Yes and now things have changed and your husband is suffering as a result. Also how long can you keep up that level of cleaning even if it did work, which it doesn't. I would rehome the cat because it's unfair for your husband to have to suffer like this if indeed what others have written is accurate as far as not being able to get rid of what is triggering his allergies.

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    Gold Member kuteknish's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by LHGirl
    Twice in your original post, you mentioned your husband being allergic:




    But in your response to me below, he is now intolerant vs. allergic? Which is it?




    I'd like to clarify this, because intolerant and allergic are two very different things.

    I personally do not like cats. However, if I was not allergic, and my SO had a cat, I'd learn to live with it, and hopefully learn to love it. I cannot live with it due to my allergies, but that is very different to one being intolerant.

    I was once in a relationship with a guy who had 2 cats that he loved dearly, which is what drove me to the allergist in the first place. I'd never in a million years make him get rid of his cats, but despite all the Rx stuff the doctor gave me, I wouldn't have been able to live with them. We never got that far, but it's a tough decision.
    Excuse me for using the wrong adjective.... he has a strong intolerance, and I donít think itís wrong to say ďallergyĒ as that it what it is, but more along the lines of a seasonal allergy reaction- sneezing, stuffy nose, watery eyes, etc.
    he says ďallergyĒ but I guess I wasnít descriptive enough for this forum.... I know plenty of people who are allergic to cats, but not in such a way that you might be allergic to them and they either have a cat, or are around cats... there ARE actions that can be taken to reduce the discomfort one might feel and things you can do in your home as such... was merely hoping someone might have some tips outside of google

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    No one is judging you.

    Thatwasthen was asking a question as to why you'd have a cat, knowing your husband is allergic. You responded, with the fact that your cat is 14, and you've only been together 3 years. That info would have been helpful in your initial post.

    Unfortunately, if he's allergic vs. intolerant (and by the sounds of all the sneezing he's doing, it's allergic), you'll have to figure out an area, or a room of the house, in which the cat can reside.

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    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
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    Sorry if you feel judged. However: Telling us you kept her in the garage or a separate room is a lot different then what you've explained above.

    Have you googled for some ideas on how to help someone who is allergic to cats not be so affected?

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