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Thread: Advice needed: Keep an aggressive dog or not?

  1. #51
    Platinum Member journeynow's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    Wiseman2...........he put her on prozac, which I am reluctant to give to her. I haven't picked up the script as of yet. I don't like to see animals drugged, but he
    feels it is the best, at least for now. The other suggestions were: putting her in isolation after scolding her: ex......"no bite!", and then putting her in a crate for
    an hour to start with. Another suggestion was to have her on a choke chain when people visit. The choke chain is for training purposes only using the pull and jerk
    motions after giving a command. Then immediately remove the chain from her after training.
    What do you think?
    Also, correct her when she growls at someone near you. Let her know that is NOT her job.

    I have found with some dogs if I put a leash on them indoors and let it drag around it settles them down a notch or two. It also makes it easier to correct them quicker, or divert their attention.

    You could muzzle your dog. There are different styles, and you can get one that allows her to drink water and move her mouth, but just not bite anyone.

  2. #52
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    Originally Posted by journeynow
    Also, correct her when she growls at someone near you. Let her know that is NOT her job.

    I have found with some dogs if I put a leash on them indoors and let it drag around it settles them down a notch or two. It also makes it easier to correct them quicker, or divert their attention.

    You could muzzle your dog. There are different styles, and you can get one that allows her to drink water and move her mouth, but just not bite anyone.
    You don't correct a dog for growling - because then they learn growling is bad and will go from silence to bite instead. A growl is a warning. its "i feel unsafe" "you are too close" I learned this from a group that works with feral dogs and dogs that have fear or aggression issue - and most of them - its really fear.

    This is a TEENY TINY dog - not a 100 lb dog -- there are all sorts of fear responses -- like being afraid to be stepped in or crunched. Its a combo of socilization and simply removing the dog from certain situations - if people are running all over or there is a house party with lots of feet around -- you crate the dog, or put them in the bedroom with a blanket and then problem solved_-- no growling because the dog is not afraid and doesn't have to be protective. Dogs who are lap held or carried in a purse tend to be very protective of people within their owner's immediate personal space - they are treated more like accessories than dogs

  3. #53
    Platinum Member journeynow's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by abitbroken
    You don't correct a dog for growling - because then they learn growling is bad and will go from silence to bite instead. A growl is a warning. its "i feel unsafe" "you are too close" I learned this from a group that works with feral dogs and dogs that have fear or aggression issue - and most of them - its really fear.
    In a situation where the dog is showing dominance? What about redirecting, getting his attention, giving him something to do, having him sit, etc. He's a 27 lb dog that bites to the point of requiring stitches. I would not let people lean over a dog, I would do what I can to stop them first, but ultimately my dog is my responsibility, and they can come to me for protection, they do not need to do the biting.

  4. #54
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    Originally Posted by journeynow
    In a situation where the dog is showing dominance? What about redirecting, getting his attention, giving him something to do, having him sit, etc. He's a 27 lb dog that bites to the point of requiring stitches. I would not let people lean over a dog, I would do what I can to stop them first, but ultimately my dog is my responsibility, and they can come to me for protection, they do not need to do the biting.
    redirecting is perfect!

    But scolding a dog for growling as the "bad thing" but doing nothing else just teaches the dog growling is the bad thing -- they just skip the warning next time.

    And there is setting the dog up for failure -- like having the dog out if there is a lot of commotion going on when the dog is not used to any people being over - or holding the dog like a baby while people come and lean over you or cross you personal space.

    Honestly, the letting people lean over, etc, is not a dominance issue -- the dog is either afraid of being squashed or is doing what dogs used to be encouraged to do - protect their owner. They are being put in a bad spot (fear of being squashed, someone else in VERY close quarters to the owner where the dog NATURALLY would be protective). My brother's dog is the sweetest goofball but does not like anyone getting too close to his face. I mean, you can pet the top of his head. The vet can slowly and deliberately run a hand over his mouth but he doesn't like to be crowded like that and WILL growl. Getting up in his face/grabbing his face sets the dog up for failure. The 5 year old niece knows this and is very sweet and awesome with the dog. She extends her outstretched hand to let him take a treat from her, etc. she pets his back unless he puts her head in her lap and therefore tells her its okay to pet her head. On the other hand -- the toddlers come over === the dog is babygated away.

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  6. #55
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    Originally Posted by journeynow
    In a situation where the dog is showing dominance? What about redirecting, getting his attention, giving him something to do, having him sit, etc. He's a 27 lb dog that bites to the point of requiring stitches. I would not let people lean over a dog, I would do what I can to stop them first, but ultimately my dog is my responsibility, and they can come to me for protection, they do not need to do the biting.
    People don't always listen and trying to stop someone in the moment puts you in a stressful situation - the dog senses your stress. > you can head it off in public by continuing a brisk pace and saying "sorry, my dog doesn't like to petted" but relatives think "its only me....he/she likes me!" And that means when its time for everyone to say goodbye, you put the dog away and then give your hugs and say goodbye.

    When a dog doesn't bite, but is naturally anxious or has separation anxiety - the best thing to do is not make a big fuss when you leave the house or when you come back -- if the dog is just calmly separated from guests at key times - the dog is not put in a bad spot. I would say the same principle applies about not putting a dog in a bad spot.

    My smaller dog that i had could not stand people who talked in shrill baby voices to her and tried to get in her face - people that would make strong eye contact and talk in a shrill voice and refused to stop would probably get their ankle bitten. So i would tell them that she doesn't like that - and they ignored it because "all dogs love me' they say -- so for her protection, she was separated from guests.

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