Facebook share
LinkedIn share
Google plus share
Twitter plus share
Give Advice
Ask For Advice
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 55

Thread: Advice needed: Keep an aggressive dog or not?

  1. #41
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    23,948
    Gender
    Female
    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    Abitbroken............no, she is not a small terrier. She weights around 27 lbs. The reason I picked her up that night was to get her off the bed, but she is not treated like doll.
    She is dead weight and not easy to carry around.
    I consulted with the vet today and he suggested several things we can try at home, so I am going to give it my best shot.
    That is still a small dog. To me, anything 30 lbs and under is small when you are used to dogs that are 75-150 lbs all the time.
    And if the dog only seems to bite when someone reaches over into YOUR physical space, etc that is very easily remedied by being upfront with guests not to lean in for a hug when you are holding the dog or the dog is close to your body. When people are going to leave, you excuse yourself to put the dog away in her crate or the other room and you hug and kiss and all that stuff. Most dogs I knew growing up were not slobbery goofballs who loved everyone. They were protective of "their kids". One of my relative's dogs won't let anyone get in between him and his person. And the dog is a lovely, sweetheart. At family functions, the dog is put in the other room. Or with close family that knows the dog, the dog likes to be petted and comes and asks for it -- just as long as you are not trying to wedge yourself in between the owner and the dog.

    I think that you need to also see a trainer - not just a vet -- because a trainer also trains the person to better anticipate and communicate with the dog. The vet has no idea to see how its actually being implemented at home. I hope the vet is suggesting some common sense.

  2. #42
    Platinum Member j.man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    10,395
    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    Wiseman2...........he put her on prozac, which I am reluctant to give to her. I haven't picked up the script as of yet. I don't like to see animals drugged, but he
    feels it is the best, at least for now. The other suggestions were: putting her in isolation after scolding her: ex......"no bite!", and then putting her in a crate for
    an hour to start with. Another suggestion was to have her on a choke chain when people visit. The choke chain is for training purposes only using the pull and jerk
    motions after giving a command. Then immediately remove the chain from her after training.
    What do you think?
    So where's the positive reinforcement in all this? I can understand punitive measures to stop a dog from doing something dangerous or violent, but this is who you raised the dog to be. You can't undo 6 years of failure to socially condition the dog by just sticking it in the kennel for an hour at a time (which is awful, as the dog's not going to have the faintest idea why she's in the cage after only a few minutes). Your dog isn't a bad dog. She sounds like she'd be a good dog if you were elderly and solitary or, as someone else suggested, she were on a farm deterring pests. She just wasn't raised to appropriately handle other people.

    Hire a trainer. Don't cut corners.

  3. #43
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    50,184
    Originally Posted by abitbroken
    That is still a small dog. To me, anything 30 lbs and under is small when you are used to dogs that are 75-150 lbs all the time.
    And if the dog only seems to bite when someone reaches over into YOUR physical space, etc that is very easily remedied by being upfront with guests not to lean in for a hug when you are holding the dog or the dog is close to your body. When people are going to leave, you excuse yourself to put the dog away in her crate or the other room and you hug and kiss and all that stuff. Most dogs I knew growing up were not slobbery goofballs who loved everyone. They were protective of "their kids". One of my relative's dogs won't let anyone get in between him and his person. And the dog is a lovely, sweetheart. At family functions, the dog is put in the other room. Or with close family that knows the dog, the dog likes to be petted and comes and asks for it -- just as long as you are not trying to wedge yourself in between the owner and the dog.

    I think that you need to also see a trainer - not just a vet -- because a trainer also trains the person to better anticipate and communicate with the dog. The vet has no idea to see how its actually being implemented at home. I hope the vet is suggesting some common sense.
    And then I wouldn't have any child over unless the child's caregiver/parent is going to be hovering to make sure the child doesn't inadvertently get too close. Or anyone who can't be reliably trusted to follow that rule. I personally would have no guests over unless the dog is in a crate or another room because it's too easy to slip up and the results could be devastating or at least very annoying (like torn clothing, etc).

  4. #44
    Platinum Member SherrySher's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    5,611
    I opt to have the dog put down. I see no other solution. The second a dog bites there is a huge problem. This dog has bitten more than once and you've tried different things.
    My Dad would mean far more to me than a dog who is going to attack him.
    No one else is going to want to take on a dog that bites, therefore you've only got one solution. Not what anyone would want, but your poor Dad doesn't need anymore harm done.

  5.  

  6. #45
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    162
    Positive reinforcements happen when she obeys a command. For example, she used to bolt and run when any exterior door was opened. I had to train her to "stay" by
    giving her treats when obeys the command. Using negative punishment is removing the dog or isolating an animal that misbehaves and she doesn't like that. The other suggestion the vet recommended was to have her wear a muzzle.
    So many things to think about. I don't think she is a bad dog. She just needs better training. We shall see.......

  7. #46
    Platinum Member thealchemist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,597
    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    Positive reinforcements happen when she obeys a command. For example, she used to bolt and run when any exterior door was opened. I had to train her to "stay" by
    giving her treats when obeys the command. Using negative punishment is removing the dog or isolating an animal that misbehaves and she doesn't like that. The other suggestion the vet recommended was to have her wear a muzzle.
    So many things to think about. I don't think she is a bad dog. She just needs better training. We shall see.......
    Negative reinforcement and punishment are different things.

    Negative reinforcement isn't very effective with dogs. That is like taking away their toy because they misbehave. This takes higher reasoning.

    Punishment is isolation or scolding.

    In my opinion I would never use a choke collar on a dog.

    All dogs want is to be safe and make their owner happy. That is pretty much it with most dogs.

    I personally use isolation and a firm "no". Not yelling or anything. I even explain to them what they did and why it isn't ok.

    I don't yell but they understand that I'm not happy. That has more affect than anything I've used.

    You can use treats, I personally don't. I used to give treats and praise them a lot but I find they don't care about treats, it is mostly the praise.

    Unless they are a pretty untamed dog that should be enough.

  8. #47
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    23,948
    Gender
    Female
    Originally Posted by Batya33
    And then I wouldn't have any child over unless the child's caregiver/parent is going to be hovering to make sure the child doesn't inadvertently get too close. Or anyone who can't be reliably trusted to follow that rule. I personally would have no guests over unless the dog is in a crate or another room because it's too easy to slip up and the results could be devastating or at least very annoying (like torn clothing, etc).
    You are being a bit extreme there. its very easy to deal with the dog and adults. When people are due to arrive you put the dog away and after the commotion of people coming through the door and kissing and bear hugging is over, the dog can come out. When its time for someone to say goodbye, you put the dog away again or you see them coming towards you and you use your body to make sure the dog is not between you and them. you say "i'll come say goodbye to you over there, just a second." Of course, if a repair person comes over, the dog goes away -- that's just total common sense that every dog owner should do.

    as far as kids, I doubt you suddenly have an army of 2 year olds over. you simply babygate the dog away from your company so the dog can have some peace and quiet. Even with the most friendly dogs, I don't allow the dogs to be out with small children who are prone to pulling ears. I have had friendly dogs who were total goofballs and i have had older dogs that were very mellow but just not used to the commotion of children. They reveled in the peace and quiet they got lounging in the bedroom when kids were over.

    Actually, you are protecting your dog from kids - so they aren't poked in the eye or sat on - even the most tolerant dogs hate that.

    we had a party last fourth of july and we kept the current dog separate when everyone was over going in and out of the house. After the meal, and when everyone split off to the backyard or down the street for fireworks the house was empty, so the dog got more freedom and then we babygated once fireworks in the neighborhood started just so they didn't accidentally get out.

    Honestly, you should try that. If the dog bit your dad ONE TIME in an 8 year period, your dog is not this dog that just bites everyone all the time. There was a trigger involved. Your dog needs you to be a knowledgeable owner and if you are not willing to let the dog have her own place to chill out when there is commotion in the house, you are expecting way too much of most dogs

  9. #48
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    23,948
    Gender
    Female
    Punishment is isolation or scolding.


    a lot of dogs do like having their 'cave' or safe spot and will voluntarily retreat to a crate that is covered on top if things get to be too much or too noisy. Putting a dog in the bedroom or a place in the house they like to chill out and be away from little kids may be a relief for them - i don't consider that punishment. My parent's dog retreats into the bedroom on her own during visits and takes a nap

  10. #49
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    162
    therealchemist..........Barbara Woodhouse, author of the book, "NO BAD DOGS", was an advocate for choke collars as part of training. I don't really seem the harm it can
    cause. And of course, my vet recommended it as well.

    Abitbroken......I agree with you that isolating an animal is necessary when they misbehave or when a repairman comes to the house or guests arrive and can cause animals
    like mine to become anxious and potentially aggressive. She typically removes herself and finds her quiet spot or "cave" when she is tired or fearful of something.

  11. #50
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    18
    I agree with those who say training. I have two german shepherds, one is a compleete ham and loves everything, the other is a scardey cat and afraid of everything and was very protective of my ex. After extensive work with multiple trainers she is starting to come around. Exact same thing, would get agressive when anything required ny exs attention and attack.

    We learned how to control and respond to the dog. Nit outting the dog in a situation where she felt the need to be agressive, and my ex or I had/have to be assertive with the dog. Sinple things like eating inolain view if the dog and making her wait until after people eat dinner to eat, making her sit and stay and than wait for us to go through doors first than the dog, etc. rewards are lots of love and praise for doing good, punishment is a very stern NO! So if you wanted to give me a hug the dog would be put in a down stay and made to wait until the hug ended, than she would be allowed to sniff and greet..

    I worked with a trainer near my house, Jamie Scott. To give you some idea of what training entails you should watch his video clips. [Register to see the link]

    From what I have expierienced it is allot of work but it also yields great results.

    From what you have said the dog is fearful of others hurting you and taking you away from her, so she snaps/bites. This is not an insult to you in anyway but the dog doesnt understand you are the leader and to trust your decisions so shes deciding on her own. With proper training you can change this relationship and at the same time help your dog become less fearful.

    Best of luck

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast

Give Advice
Ask For Advice

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •