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Thread: Advice needed: Keep an aggressive dog or not?

  1. #31
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    Strange. Sounds like a flying monkey more so than a dog.

  2. #32
    Platinum Member thealchemist's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    "Now you're having people shove their faces in your dog's face for a kiss"........is not what I said. I didn't MAKE my father lean over to get a kiss, which he has done many times before without incident, the only difference this time was that I was holding her and she felt threatened as he was getting to close to me.
    My dog has aggressive issues, which complicate matters at home, but she is overly affectionate and playful and happily accepts people into our homes that we accept. The aggression occurs mostly when someone gets to close to me, hugs me or reaches out to me. Typically, she barks and growls to warn. If it happens to quickly and she feels there is no time to warn, she bites! Simply, I have never owned a dog that has anxiety and bites. I have been very lucky in that my rescues have adapted very well and socializes well.
    I didn't do anything any different this time and I am not one to every strike a dog. I have attempted to train her when she misbehaves, but not with great success, I am sad to
    say......
    All that you have said here makes it very likely it is a doninance issue and you have let your dog think it is the boss over everything. But that the dog isn't a really bad dog.

  3. #33
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    Seraphim.......I don't hit animals and never said I did. I sought the advice of my vet and it was his decision to put her on anxiety issues because he believed
    she has anxiety, and that is why, in his opinion, she lashes out. I don't know if I will ever get the chance to observe how a dominant dog disciplines another pack,
    but I would be interested in learning. All my efforts have failed. Sadly enough.

  4. #34
    Platinum Member thealchemist's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    Seraphim.......I don't hit animals and never said I did. I sought the advice of my vet and it was his decision to put her on anxiety issues because he believed
    she has anxiety, and that is why, in his opinion, she lashes out. I don't know if I will ever get the chance to observe how a dominant dog disciplines another pack,
    but I would be interested in learning. All my efforts have failed. Sadly enough.
    Well dominance is simply whose rules are followed.

    It really isn't about using force to establish pecking order.

    In the wild that is how animals establish dominance but I don't want to have to tackle my dog and bare my teeth at it every time he steps out of line.

    It is better established by other means.

    For instance, when you go to a door and plan to leave, if your dog runs up and expects to jump out before you, that is a lack of clear dominance.

    If my dogs do that I won't open the door until they back off and they go through only after me.

    Or establishing where they sleep...

    My dogs are not allowed on the bed because it can cause dominance issues too.

    I also do not let them get away with disobeying me because then they think they have the authority to do as they see fit.

    So if I tell them to leave the room because I am cooking and have food out (which means they can't be around) and they ignore me I don't ever just roll over and ignore it.

    I make them leave and possibly punish them if they don't do it accordingly. Punishment doesn't mean hit them either.

    Consistency is key.

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  6. #35
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    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    "Now you're having people shove their faces in your dog's face for a kiss"........is not what I said. I didn't MAKE my father lean over to get a kiss, which he has done many times before without incident, the only difference this time was that I was holding her and she felt threatened as he was getting to close to me.
    My dog has aggressive issues, which complicate matters at home, but she is overly affectionate and playful and happily accepts people into our homes that we accept. The aggression occurs mostly when someone gets to close to me, hugs me or reaches out to me. Typically, she barks and growls to warn. If it happens to quickly and she feels there is no time to warn, she bites! Simply, I have never owned a dog that has anxiety and bites. I have been very lucky in that my rescues have adapted very well and socializes well.
    I didn't do anything any different this time and I am not one to every strike a dog. I have attempted to train her when she misbehaves, but not with great success, I am sad to
    say......
    If you were holding her -- then she is a small dog. Is she a terrier/chihuaua mix or something like that?

    Basically, you are describing small dog syndrome. People treat little dogs like dolls. They bite because they get extremely protective of their owner -especially if they are carried around a lot. A friend of mine has a teeny tiny dog that she rescued and she makes the dog go outside to the bathroom like bigger dogs - no pee pee pad. She taught her how to walk on a leash and is expected to walk on her own two feet.

    It seems that this whole problem can be solved by you PUTTING THE DOG DOWN when its time to say goodbye to people and instruct your guests that when you have the dog, they don't lean into you. Its that simple.

    Remember - tiny dogs can get nervous easily when people walk around in heavy boots - speak in booming voices or try to grab them.

    My small dog who was a small mix was the same way --- if someone grabbed me, leaned into me or got into my space while i was ho
    lding her - she was owned by an elderly person who treated her like their little doll -- had a purse carrier, they were always on the lap, etc. , so they learned to be very protective. I quickly learned her wavelength and made sure that no one who came over picked her up (if she jumped into your lap while you were on the floor - then you could pick her up, but no other way.) i learned that aside from carrying her down stairs outdoors, she walked and had to behave like the other dogs.


    To me it sounds like your dog is behaving like a dog - and you need to help her by not creating situations where she is scared --- if you are sitting in a chair, imagine her sitting there with someone else's body suddenly comes close to being on top of you (for a hug), and if you are nervous about that hug because the dog is in your lap, the dog picks up on it.

    I think with some common sense, you will be fine. But you have to use some common sense here.

  7. #36
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    You have to be consistent every single solitary time, like with kids. If not you’re toast.

  8. #37
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    Abitbroken............no, she is not a small terrier. She weights around 27 lbs. The reason I picked her up that night was to get her off the bed, but she is not treated like doll.
    She is dead weight and not easy to carry around.
    I consulted with the vet today and he suggested several things we can try at home, so I am going to give it my best shot.

  9. #38
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    What did the vet recommend?
    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    I consulted with the vet today and he suggested several things we can try at home.

  10. #39
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    Wiseman2...........he put her on prozac, which I am reluctant to give to her. I haven't picked up the script as of yet. I don't like to see animals drugged, but he
    feels it is the best, at least for now. The other suggestions were: putting her in isolation after scolding her: ex......"no bite!", and then putting her in a crate for
    an hour to start with. Another suggestion was to have her on a choke chain when people visit. The choke chain is for training purposes only using the pull and jerk
    motions after giving a command. Then immediately remove the chain from her after training.
    What do you think?

  11. #40
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    Listen to the vet. Or get rid of the dog. Or risk serious injury to your family or visitors, getting arrested (for elderly neglect, documented 2x now by hospitals) and going bankrupt when you are sued for damages by visitors, neighbors etc..

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