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Thread: Advice needed: Keep an aggressive dog or not?

  1. #21
    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
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    Well, up to her but I'm not going to suggest she keep a dog that bites nor will I guilt her into making any type of decision. I don't think any of us know enough about her dog or dogs in general to be certain of what and what isn't what she should be doing so IMO, the best advice is to talk to her vet and perhaps the dog pound to see if they have any suggestions.

    If she bites anyone else then laws in a lot of jurisdictions will dictate that she put down so there's that to think about.

  2. #22
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    Originally Posted by ThatwasThen
    Well, up to her but I'm not going to suggest she keep a dog that bites nor will I guilt her into making any type of decision. I don't think any of us know enough about her dog or dogs in general to be certain of what and what isn't what she should be doing so IMO, the best advice is to talk to her vet and perhaps the dog pound to see if they have any suggestions.

    If she bites anyone else then laws in a lot of jurisdictions will dictate that she put down so there's that to think about.
    The "dog pound" is a bad idea. A reputable, foster based rescue is the way to go. Pounds will just put the dog down if it doesn't get adopted in a set number of days and a fearful dog will be even more fearful there in that environment and not do well or have any chance of getting adopted. Researching online rescues that specifically deal with dogs needing rehabilitiation or "scared" dogs, etc. But at 8 years old, with some training of the owner, sometimes its best to "manage" the dog at home - babygates, proper introduction to strangers in doses, etc. and actually get a trainer instead of just simply dumping the dog somewhere else.

    I had a SMALL dog that was protective and freaked out when anyone reached into my personal space. It got better because i started to manage the behavior (if i ran into someone i knew in public, i would extend a hand out to head off them coming in for a hug, or i would tell them 'my dog is a bit protective....'), but people gave her slack because she was little where they would not give a bigger dog any slack.

    Anyway -- whatever the decision -- contact a trainer.

  3. #23
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    She may do much better in another home without all the stress and complications you have there.

  4. #24
    Platinum Member thealchemist's Avatar
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    I have raised and trained many rescue dogs.

    I will say that your dogs aggressive behavior does not sound like that of a psychotic dog. I have dealt with those before and there are mostly untrainable.

    It sounds like your dog has developed aggressive habits based off of your interactions with the dog.

    It sounds mostly like you have given the dog dominance over your household and you. It also seems like your dog has antisocial tendencies, which makes socializing crucial.

    I am not a big fan of drugging the consciousness out of a pet. Most those drugs have a poor record of actually helping balance brain chemistry and essentially just zonk your dog out.

    But unless you can put the pet into a specialized area for aggressive dogs then you just need to put it down.

    I would recommend reading some literature or taking a class on how to train dogs if you want to be a responsible owner.

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  6. #25
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    Originally Posted by thealchemist
    I have raised and trained many rescue dogs.

    I will say that your dogs aggressive behavior does not sound like that of a psychotic dog. I have dealt with those before and there are mostly untrainable.

    It sounds like your dog has developed aggressive habits based off of your interactions with the dog.

    It sounds mostly like you have given the dog dominance over your household and you. It also seems like your dog has antisocial tendencies, which makes socializing crucial.

    I am not a big fan of drugging the consciousness out of a pet. Most those drugs have a poor record of actually helping balance brain chemistry and essentially just zonk your dog out.

    But unless you can put the pet into a specialized area for aggressive dogs then you just need to put it down.

    I would recommend reading some literature or taking a class on how to train dogs if you want to be a responsible owner.
    I have to agree. Was the dog treated like a ď humanĒ and not like a dog? Dogs live in hierarchical society . If you donít assert your dominance as the Alpha but instead treat them like a pampered child they become a nervous wreck .

  7. #26
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    Originally Posted by ThatwasThen
    Well, I'm not Dog Whisperer but I don't think its a good idea to lean in to kiss any dog. If they want to lick you in an appreciation and 'love' they will do it without moving in on them.

    I hope you can find a farm or something where she can keep the barn cats in line and isn't around any kids. If not, then sadly I think there is only one other choice for her. (IMNSHO)
    Yes it is absolutely not a good move to lean in and kiss the dog . That is an aggressive move in dog language . Never put your face in a dogís face . My husband did this once with his cousinís dog and the dog was part husky and part wolf. She dug her top canines into the top of his skull and her bottom canines through his chin . She was going to tear his face off . My husband was not raised with dogs and knows little to nothing about them. I was raised with dogs my entire childhood though .

  8. #27
    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by abitbroken
    The "dog pound" is a bad idea.
    Then I suggest she be put out of her nervous wreck misery if the pound can't give her any advice based on their training in such matters.

  9. #28
    Platinum Member j.man's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Sweet Sue
    Yatsue.......I really wish I knew more about her history. The animal shelter that I got her from had no information about her history. I sensed in the beginning that she was nervous and thought that the problem would go away once she became used to us. Most of the dogs I have owned have been rescues, and I haven't done anything differently. It is very possible that she came from an abusive home or was placed in various homes the first year of her life.
    You got your dog when it was a year old. That's not even fully developed. I wouldn't be looking for its past as a scapegoat. This dog clearly was not socialized, and, at least from all the details you've given, even if she's got some legit anxiety, it doesn't sound a whole lot more complicated than that. In fact, given you admit most your dogs have been rescues, the problem could have been that you were actually given a relatively clean slate for a dog. Aggression towards humans can be an issue with rescues, but it's far, far, far more likely they've been conditioned to be submissive, which comes with its own plethora of issues. You had a responsibility to socialize and establish boundaries between the dog and people (going both ways). Now you're having people shove their faces in your dog's for a kiss? While you're holding her and denying her egress, no less?

    I gotta say, though unfortunately not for the reasons I'd like to be, I'm actually a bit more hopeful for the dog. Doing some reading on canine behavior and, while trying my best not to be mean, exercising some overall common sense would likely make a huge difference. It would seem this isn't simply a case of the dog being overprotective in the entire territory of the home, but actively being put into situations that would understandably exacerbate its behavioral issues. I'm not saying I'd ever trust my kid nieces around her, but that would be easy enough to control for.

  10. #29
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    "Now you're having people shove their faces in your dog's face for a kiss"........is not what I said. I didn't MAKE my father lean over to get a kiss, which he has done many times before without incident, the only difference this time was that I was holding her and she felt threatened as he was getting to close to me.
    My dog has aggressive issues, which complicate matters at home, but she is overly affectionate and playful and happily accepts people into our homes that we accept. The aggression occurs mostly when someone gets to close to me, hugs me or reaches out to me. Typically, she barks and growls to warn. If it happens to quickly and she feels there is no time to warn, she bites! Simply, I have never owned a dog that has anxiety and bites. I have been very lucky in that my rescues have adapted very well and socializes well.
    I didn't do anything any different this time and I am not one to every strike a dog. I have attempted to train her when she misbehaves, but not with great success, I am sad to
    say......

  11. #30
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    You need to put her in her place. She is not the dominant animal. She thinks she is and therefore is nervous. She needs to understand YOU are the alpha and wonít tolerate her aggression. In nature the alpha would teach her a lesson until she submitted. Locking her in a room and drugging her is not making the connection for her. Watch how a dominant dog disciplines another of the pack. You donít need to hit her that is wrong but you need to make her submit to the lead dog, ie, you.

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