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Thread: Sole water for anxiety? Anybody tried it?

  1. #31
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    I get to see whichever doctor is available in 3 weeks at my local health centre. Last time I went to an out of hours service they told me they only deal with "acute" problems and I would have to make my appointment with my gp.

    The health centre I go to is full of terrible doctors and nurses (one of which falsely informed me that smear tests for cervical cancer are not available privately). I have seen only one good doctor there out of about 6 different ones. I believe a lot of them aren't even permanent. The last referral I got was for a chiropodist was over 30 miles away after a 3 month wait. It's ridiculous.

  2. #32
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    Originally Posted by sophie274
    In that case, I would focus on more broad principles - eating a well-balanced, healthy diet, drinking a normal amount of water, getting vigorous exercise every day, trying to get around 8 hours of quality sleep every day, perhaps making time for mindfulness/meditation or a hobby that brings you pleasure and that you find relaxing. Exercise especially has proven benefits for depression and anxiety. And then I would follow up with your doctors re: your dark urine and shooting pains when urinating.

    I know that I often crave foods that are delicious but not particularly good for me. Salty foods taste delicious so I personally wouldn't take a craving as an indication that I'm deficient in salt, but if you are really restricting the amount of salt in your diet then it's possible that's where your craving is coming from. Most people don't have trouble getting enough salt in their diet and tend to eat too much rather than too little salt.
    I'm doing all these things plus trying to socialise as much as possible. I don't restrict my diet except to avoid stimulants and sugar and not eating many takeaways. I'm on the heartbreak diet at the moment so got very little appetite and feel nauseous most of the time. I guess I'm just at the beginning of this journey so I will likely improve over time.

    I don't think I'm deficient in salt, I think I'm deficient in minerals. Luckily my body craves things that are good for me.

  3. #33

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    Sodium Deficiency

    Sodium deficiency (Hyponatremia) is not uncommon among adults. It is also common for people on some types of antidepressants. Extreme cases can lead to kidney failure, heart failure, brain swelling leading to seizures, etc. Less severe symptoms can be heart palpitations, mental confusion, trouble sleeping, fatigue, restlessness, and more.

    If you sweat a lot and are on a low sodium diet, you likely have depleted sodium (and electrolyte) levels. In fact, if you are on a low sodium diet at all, you might have low sodium levels which could be contributing to issues.

    Among other things, sodium regulates fluids in your body, which also helps regulate blood pressure. Why elevated sodium levels would help your kidneys is because your body has too much fluid in it when levels are low, and it can be hard on the kidneys, which need a balance to function properly.

    Historically, people not having access to sodium has lead to death and illness, specifically those whose bodies seem to require more sodium. Some form of sodium has been significant in every culture of the past.

    We are dealing with an issue where science has been mistaken, and it will take a long time to undo the ingrained thinking that salt is bad for us. There is science out there showing the dangers of low sodium levels, but science is having a hard time accepting that we actually need more sodium than what is being suggested.

    As for the person recommending lemon juice: while lemon juice is great for health, lemon juice is a diuretic, and anyone who has low electrolyte levels will want to be careful when taking diuretics.

    Don't take my word for it, do some research yourself.

  4. #34
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    The number one thing anyone can do to improve their health is reduce their sodium intake to no more than 2000 mg/day. Excess sodium intake contributes to hypertension, kidney problems etc. All living matter contains sodium. Processed and junk food can contain an entire day's recommended value in one serving. Read the labels of everything you eat. The other thing you can do to improve health is to avoid snake oil and dangerous nonsense fads. This is no magic bullet panacea. It's the same as get-rich-quick schemes. The best thing anyone can do is eat a healthy balanced diet, get rid of excess supplements by eating well and of course, have appropriate activity, sleep and stress reduction techniques.

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  6. #35
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    If your urethra burns, you might have a urinary tract infection. See your doctor. And also maybe go see a dietician that is familiar with kidney issues to prescribe the best changes to your diet to be supportive of your condition. Do not take Sole water - informercials and ads are just trying to sell product.

  7. #36
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    Guys, this thread is over 2 years old. June of 2017.

  8. #37

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    Originally Posted by Wiseman2
    The number one thing anyone can do to improve their health is reduce their sodium intake to no more than 2000 mg/day. Excess sodium intake contributes to hypertension, kidney problems etc. All living matter contains sodium. Processed and junk food can contain an entire day's recommended value in one serving. Read the labels of everything you eat. The other thing you can do to improve health is to avoid snake oil and dangerous nonsense fads. This is no magic bullet panacea. It's the same as get-rich-quick schemes. The best thing anyone can do is eat a healthy balanced diet, get rid of excess supplements by eating well and of course, have appropriate activity, sleep and stress reduction techniques.
    2000 mg per day is not enough sodium for most people, and for some people that limit can cause the exact symptoms that you say it can help prevent, and more.

    The science is there, but no one wants to believe that we've gotten it so wrong. You should look into the book The Salt Fix by Dr. DiNicolantonio.

    You are right that we need to eat whole foods and not processed foods. And it is best to get our sodium as much as possible in the form of organic sodium in the foods we eat, but limiting sodium in the diet is much more dangerous than having too much sodium.

    So many people are sodium deficient and don't know it. It is the most important mineral in our body. It is so important, when people are in critical or unstable condition, they inject it directly into our blood through IVs. Without enough sodium, we have heart and kidney failure.

    People listen to guidelines based on outdated philosophies and fail to research what science says about the dangers of low sodium (and other electrolytes).

  9. #38
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    As someone who has had multiple surgeries for kidney issues, I can tell you this: your general practitioner will not always catch what is going on. I went to the doctor several times about pain and he did tests and everything came back normal. He said I probably had heartburn or strained muscles. Later that year, I had an emergency appendectomy. The surgeon said my left kidney was twice the normal size and in nephrosis. Turns out everything wasn't normal.
    Fast forward to today: I have had four surgeries for my kidney defect. I only have one working kidney. I still have residual issues. But I am healthy!

    Shooting pain is not normal. Don't settle for that answer.

    Sidenote: my general practitioner is a wonderful doctor who did everything he could and I don't blame him for an instant for not being able to diagnose my nephrosis. My condition is extremely rare and was simply out of his wheelhouse.

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