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Thread: Cat's digestive issues - what to do?

  1. #21
    Bronze Member Blue Ridge's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by DancingFool
    If your cats are healthy and happy on the food, then leave them be.


    The debates over what's the best brand aside, keep in mind that your animals are actually individuals. So what's great for one, may be not so good for another. Tolerance/adaptability to food will vary from pet to pet. General rule of thumb is if your critter is doing well on a particular diet, leave well enough alone and especially so if they are old.
    Really could not disagree more. "Doing well," is subjective, and young animals with good genetics can appear quite healthy with all sorts of nutrient deficiencies. Look at it this way -I've known young men and women with great physiques who eat McDonald's regularly and are alcoholics. You wouldn't say "You look great, so carry on with whatever you are doing," would you? And while all cats are individuals, NONE of them are animals who need added vegetation to their diet. They are obligate carnivores. They have no enzymes to break down cellulose and plant proteins. The closer you can get to a meat based diet, the better.
    Originally Posted by Zaphod
    I can't argue with that as I do not work with pet food for my livelihood. My cats have always loved it, and seemed really healthy on it, they get the soft food and the dry food. However, a quick Google does reveal some results which would corroborate what you've said. The vets kickbacks bit is interesting.
    Yep, and a racket!

    Originally Posted by Zaphod
    So you're recommending Orijens are you? If you changed to it, would it have to be gradually introduced?

    Does what you say apply to the science diet wet food as well? That has always seemed great quality to me, the cats go wild for it, almost aggressive.
    Orijen contains more meat than any kibble I have found. I don't own a cat, but if I did that's what I would feed it (and what I feed my dogs). Science Diets canned foods vary a ton. The ingredient list will tell you what you need to know, though. Look for named meats, just like in dry food. Most wet foods are 80% water and seem to taste much better. As for switching from a cereal food to a meat based food, yes, you'll probably want to do that gradually. Shouldn't take long for the flora in their guts to get used to it. You might notice a difference in musculature, decrease in eye goop, better breath, and how soft their coats get within a few weeks of feeding. Most people don't bring their cats into my store, but I've seen a lot of dogs look like new animals after a month on a better diet. And what you pay more in food, you'll probably save in vet bills down the road. I can't stress enough how important it is to feed animals what they are meant to eat. It's the biggest factor of health that is under your control. The biggest (just like in humans) is genetics, of course. Some people can smoke, drink, eat ham and live to 100, much like some cats and dogs can go to nearly 20 on crappy food.

  2. #22

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    What I do is I give them half a pouch each of this twice a day (so they each get a full pouch) :



    This is their main kind of meal. Then I just throw down the biscuit (kibble?) in a bowl which is kind of there for them to nibble at as they see fit. The biscuit they are kind of neutral about, it's the pouches gravy stuff that they go wild for. So perhaps I've been unclear about the fact that when I suggested science diet, I was mainly talking about the meat in gravy, although the links I originally put up were for the kibble (I gots teh lingo) . My mistake.

    Any comments on that routine?

  3. #23

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    Nibble teh Kibble

  4. #24
    Bronze Member Blue Ridge's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Zaphod
    Any comments on that routine?
    Can't find an ingredient profile for that specific food, but most canned foods are meat based. Plus, the 80% moisture is helpful for cats who don't drink enough water (many don't). The biggest downside for canned food is the cost. There are some dehydrated foods you can add water to that are more cost efficient, but not all cats like them. You store should have a free sample you can try. Sojos and Honest Kitchen are the two big ones here in the states.

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  6. #25

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    Originally Posted by Blue Ridge
    Can't find an ingredient profile for that specific food, but most canned foods are meat based. Plus, the 80% moisture is helpful for cats who don't drink enough water (many don't). The biggest downside for canned food is the cost. There are some dehydrated foods you can add water to that are more cost efficient, but not all cats like them. You store should have a free sample you can try. Sojos and Honest Kitchen are the two big ones here in the states.
    I'm in the UK as it goes. However, giving them half a pouch each of this food, as it's really dense, and that seems more than enough for them, as opposed to giving them a whole pouch of one of the supermarket brands or commercial brands actually works out cheaper.

    I reckon that with Science Diet the main complaint seems to be the biscuit (kibble) - the wet food is an entirely different matter.

    Do you think it's possible that Hills make the biscuit without that much meat content under the assumption that the wet food will be also used in conjunction with it? Could be that, I guess. That's the combination mine are currently getting. Anyhow - sounds like the wet food is definitely ok.

  7. #26
    Bronze Member Blue Ridge's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Zaphod

    Do you think it's possible that Hills make the biscuit without that much meat content under the assumption that the wet food will be also used in conjunction with it?
    Not sure, but I'd suspect that they make kibble without much meat because meat is much more expensive than veg and they want to make their shareholders happy.

  8. #27
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Blue Ridge
    The biggest downside for canned food is the cost.
    And this:

    [IMG] ]

  9. 10-08-2016, 10:44 PM

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