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Thread: Muscle Loss and Age

  1. #271
    Platinum Member Jibralta's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by IAmFCA
    A few years ago i went to a track,sprinted 10 200s, went home. No prep, just went. I ran my patootie off.
    I am a terrible runner. I was good for a little while, back in elementary school. I was one of the fastest in my class in 2nd grade. Then things dropped off quickly. I'm just not built for running, ultimately. I still try now and then because I like the high. But the aches and pains that I get from sustained running ultimately outweigh the benefit. It kinda stinks.

    I haven't been going to the chiropractor as much as I intended. But I do go regularly. My back has improved a lot. My lower back is almost completely pain free. Just my neck/shoulder area is being stubborn. But it is improving, as well.

    I finally went back to crossfit on Tuesday morning, after several weeks off. My back and neck felt really good afterwards. No pain. I hope I will be able to resume my regular exercise schedule soon.

  2. #272
    Platinum Member Jibralta's Avatar
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    They're doing the Crossfit Open at my gym. I didn't register. But apparently that doesn't protect you from having to do the open" workouts. This morning, I had to alternate sets of like a million wall-balls with a million calories on the rowing machine for 15 minutes.

    My quads feel like they're going to explode. I am not looking forward to dealing with them tomorrow.

  3. #273
    Platinum Member Jibralta's Avatar
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    On Sunday, I rode this horse named Cheyenne. I remember him from ten years ago, when he was just a two year old. He came to our barn and immediately got sick with a cold. Poor guy. But he recovered, and he was integrated into the lesson program.

    He was real green at first, so he was given to the more advanced riders until he was trained. I remember how cute he was. And inquisitive. When I first got on him, he turned his head around and looked at my foot and leg on his flank. Sniffed the foot. Nudged it with his lip.

    He was real wiggly, too. I remember being nervous about it because I thought that he might slip and fall with me on him. But all that extra movement cleared up after his muscles got stronger. He turned into a really nice horse. Great to ride. Wonderful personality, calm, friendly.

    When I first returned to this barn to take lessons, they put me on him. It was a great choice because he's willing to go but he's not a total psycho.

    I haven't ridden him since then. I've been on this aggravating mare named Summer who only wants to move when she sees a jump. Then she launches us both into outer space. It's really stressful. She's very evasive and I'm having a difficult time getting through to her.

    I've been wanting to ride a different horse. But I'll never say that to my instructor because then it will become her life's mission to make me learn how to connect with Summer. So I've just been kinda hoping that she gets it in her own head to switch me.

    On Sunday, my hopes were answered. I was delighted to find out that I'd be riding Cheyenne for my lesson.

    Unfortunately, it was a whole new Cheyenne. A morose, unhappy Cheyenne. He was nippy in the stall, ears markedly back (though not quite pinned). I had to give him my elbow as I tightened the girth. He even tried to give me a bag of sh*t about putting his bridle on.

    I hoped that his mood would clear up when we got to the ring, but it didn't. His ears were still laid back and he just looked dull and miserable. If he was a human being, he would have had his arms crossed and a big scowl on his face.

    My instructor said, "I'm putting you on him because he needs a good rider. He's been running up on other horses, running up on walls, turning into the center, and just basically dragging people around the ring."

    I've seen him do this in lessons, actually. It's a pretty recent development. I just figured it was the rider, who is new to the barn and therefore uncertain about what kind of horse Cheyenne actually is, what he'll take, what he can do, etc.

    But when I got on him, I could see that the problem was a lot deeper. His head was way up. He felt extremely tense, like he could bolt at any moment. I knew I needed to be completely calm or my anxiety could feed into his anxiety.

    The first thing I tried to do was get his head back down so that I could use the bit. But choking up on the reins and raising my hands didn't work. My teacher finally told me to relax the reins and this proved to be key in getting Cheyenne to calm down.

    But since my rein had to remain loose, I had to rely on my body positioning to get him to slow down or stop. And of course, slowing down and stopping was his whole problem.

    So, the lesson was a real challenge. But it gave me a renewed sense of awareness and appreciation for the fact that I don't fall off easily. And that little things, like elbow position, make a huge difference.

    Something that is really shining through to me, which I am not sure if I'll be able to successfully articulate, is that I know 'who' this horse is. I've known him and ridden him since he was quite young. He is someone that I like, even if he is only a horse. I know he's 'good people.'

    I went into the lesson with the idea that I would be reconnecting with an old friend of sorts, and that we would be able to talk and have a good conversation. And that's pretty much what happened.

    For the first part of the lesson, he was very uptight and miserable. But as the lesson progressed, he started to relax. And he relaxed and relaxed and relaxed. And finally, my teacher was beaming and raving.

    When I dismounted at the end of the lesson, Cheyenne looked happy and alert. He was nuzzly and interested in sniffing noses. He forgot about biting. It made me feel so happy to see him so relaxed.

    My instructor told the barn girls not to use him for beginners or intermediates anymore. I sincerely hope they stick to that rule.

  4. #274
    Platinum Member Jibralta's Avatar
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    I rode Cheyenne again, the Saturday before last. He wasn't exactly a bundle of joy, but he didn't try to bite me when I saddled and bridled him, he stood perfectly still as I got on, and he didn't go into a panic once I was on.

    That standing still thing... totally amazing. It shouldn't be, but it seems like none of these horses can stand still while you get on. They walk on the moment you have your foot in the stirrup. I'm so used to having to scramble onto a moving horse that when he stood still, it was almost jarring. I was pitched to move forward.

    The ride was pretty uneventful until we started doing circles. Apparently, this has become a problem area for him. The week before, I didn't have a lot of trouble with it (it was really the least of my worries!). But then again, there were only three horses in the ring that week, and thus ample space for maneuvering.

    Different situation last time. There were five horses in the ring and every time I turned into the center, two other horses turned in on either side of us. Cheyenne did NOT like that. He pinned his ears and chomped left and right, at the other horses. I was really surprised.

    Worst of all, the mare on one side of us was a huge b*tch and a huge horse to boot (half draft). She was having none of his attitude and was dishing it right back. It made me pretty nervous.

    Horses can do some pretty incredible things. I remember years ago, I was cantering alongside another horse when my horse decided to pivot on his front two legs and kick the horse next to us with both of his back legs. The movement was so smooth, we didn't lose ground or stop cantering for a moment. And this wasn't some special horse. He was very, very basic. I was like holy sh*t.

    So, riding around with this mare next to us, I prayed she didn't pivot and kick my head off.

    For all his acting out, Cheyenne didn't actually do anything wrong. After a couple of circle-laden turns around the ring, I was able to time things a little better and take the stress off of everybody. That allowed me to relax and get more out of him.

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  6. #275
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    We've been reading the Little House books and enjoying how they "broke" the horses (I read them as a child but now am focusing more on those aspects) I hope "broke" is still the right description

  7. #276
    Platinum Member Jibralta's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    We've been reading the Little House books and enjoying how they "broke" the horses (I read them as a child but now am focusing more on those aspects) I hope "broke" is still the right description
    I recently read those books! I thought they were really good. They were a gift from my grandmother when I was a kid, but I could never get into them. I was too number by modern-day sensationalism.

    Nowadays, I have more of an appreciation for her experiences. Some of the things her family went through were just amazing. They were strong, tenacious people. And it seemed like they never lost their spirit.

    The books are written simply, but they paint a very rich portrait of life in the mid-to-late 1800s in the Midwest--very, very tough.

    Her husband, Almanzo, was the horse trainer. But I think she learned to do it, too, once they met and started courting.

    I may read those books again. I actually purchased a couple other books by her that aren't in the Little House series. They are collections of miscellaneous travel logs and letters. I haven't read them yet. I think I don't want the story to end!

  8. #277
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    Originally Posted by Jibralta
    I recently read those books! I thought they were really good. They were a gift from my grandmother when I was a kid, but I could never get into them. I was too number by modern-day sensationalism.

    Nowadays, I have more of an appreciation for her experiences. Some of the things her family went through were just amazing. They were strong, tenacious people. And it seemed like they never lost their spirit.

    The books are written simply, but they paint a very rich portrait of life in the mid-to-late 1800s in the Midwest--very, very tough.

    Her husband, Almanzo, was the horse trainer. But I think she learned to do it, too, once they met and started courting.

    I may read those books again. I actually purchased a couple other books by her that aren't in the Little House series. They are collections of miscellaneous travel logs and letters. I haven't read them yet. I think I don't want the story to end!
    I read all of them multiple times as a child and often munched on carrots when I read - seemed appropriate lol!

  9. #278
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    They were some of my fav books as a kid I had them all.

  10. #279
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    Well thank you! Your post gave me a missed connection in my sleep deprived brain. This morning my son asked me if he can still come and stay with us when he's a grown up - I said of course and he said "I'll always be welcome?" He's said variations of this but now I realize - last night we read about Laura packing up all her things to get ready to move in to her marital home the next day with Almanzo and the description was very detailed as far as how they rearranged her old shared bedroom so that it wouldn't look as empty or like someone was missing. Guess that made a real impression on him. And this also has to do with "body" since i wish he was a teenager/grown up who could stay on his own tomorrow so I could exercise the way I prefer (i.e. not with a boring DVD at home). Solo parenting long stretch this week but it's fine.

    Anyway thanks and I love posting about Little House -of course I watched the series and had a serious crush on Michael Landon...

  11. #280
    Silver Member Cherylyn's Avatar
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    Life gets busy but you have to take care of your health. I'm on the elliptical trainer for 45 minutes to 1 hr every other day. Or, I ride my bike around the neighborhood for 1 hr + 20 mins every other day. If you have a dog, walk your dog twice a day morning and evening. Diet, watch what you eat, eat healthy, drink a lot of water and that's how I lost 35 pounds. Stay active for heart health. You have to start somewhere. In the past, I was a runner but I don't run anymore. I do low impact sports nowadays. You can tone your muscles, look and feel good if you are serious. You can do this!

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