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Thread: " In a box not a bottle" Asperger's revealed

  1. #21
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    Thanks for the links SB!

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    You are very welcome Vic. Actually, we cross-posted just now so you may not have read my last post on the previous page re John Harpur.

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    Great!! Thank you!

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    For a few days my son didn't want to believe that Asperger's was autism. He was belligerent but as I say they need time to process. And who wouldn't need time to process that?! I am still processing it so why shouldn't he? But he has come to the acceptance now today because he said," I have autism and I am fine with that I am fine with me. And I said to him "I am fine with you too baby ,I have always been fine with you and I never want you to be a different you." And off you wanted to his Yu-Gi-Oh competition. In fact he would rather miss going to Nana's than miss Yu-Gi-Oh. Yu-Gi-Oh is now part of his Sunday routine.

    Another thing we have done is put a warning sticker on our vehicles and our door. And it says emergency caution: person with autism may not respond to verbal commands. If there's an emergency situation like a car accident, fire or something like that he may not respond appropriately. And I want Emergency personnel or police to be aware that he has a disability so if he goes into meltdown they won't be assuming that he's on drugs or drunk or something like that.

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    In 1944, an Austrian pediatrician named Hans Asperger observed four children in his practice who had difficulty integrating socially. Although their intelligence appeared normal, the children lacked nonverbal communication skills, failed to demonstrate empathy with their peers, and were physically awkward. Their speech was either disjointed or overly formal, and their all-absorbing interest in a single topic dominated their conversations. Dr. Asperger called the condition “autistic psychopathy” and described it as a personality disorder primarily marked by social isolation.

    Asperger’s observations, published in German, were not widely known until 1981, when an English doctor named Lorna Wing published a series of case studies of children showing similar symptoms, which she called “Asperger’s” syndrome. Wing’s writings were widely published and popularized. AS became a distinct disease and diagnosis in 1992, when it was included in the tenth published edition of the World Health Organization’s diagnostic manual, International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), and in 1994 it was added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), the American Psychiatric Association’s diagnostic reference book. However, scientific studies have not been able to definitively differentiate Asperger syndrome from highly functioning autism. Because autism is defined by a common set of behaviors, changes that were announced in DSM-V (which took effect in mid-2013) represent the various forms under a single diagnostic category, ASD.
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    Maybe this is a thing in my generation but I literally see red when I see people, mostly people my age, proclaim that they have autism (self diagnosed, entirely). The vast majority have never been to therapy, never taken drugs for it, never had any speech development delays (of course Asperger's doesn't have that) but they also lack the other hallmark signs of autism or Asperger's. No learning issues, and they have social skills to the point that they DO have friends that they made (without social coaching) and most have even dated! They say that they have autism because they are "socially awkward" and have "some weird interests". It makes me want to punch things! It makes me upset because there are many people out there, like your son and my siblings, who have LEGITIMATE autism and struggle with it. People pretending to have autism or deluding themselves into thinking they have because they want to feel like a unique little snowflake cheapens the diagnosis and makes other people skeptical instead of supportive. It's not some stupid social label that you can slap on yourself to make yourself feel "speeecciall". Social awkwardness/anxiety does not = autism. I am actually very awkward at times and I do not have autism. It makes me so angry.

    Sorry, just having one of those days I guess.

    BTW, the window decals you posted...I actually do have an autism decal on my car. It's of the rainbow puzzle piece ribbon and it says "autism awareness". It's for my sibs, really. I also have to wear an ID at my job and instead of using the hospital clip like everyone else does, I have a rainbow puzzle piece lanyard. It doesn't say autism on it but most people hear recognize the pattern.

    I will always be trying to educate others about autism until the day I die.

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