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Thread: the book made you change your opinion on what good literature was

  1. #1

    the book made you change your opinion on what good literature was

    The Noughts and Crossed Sequence by Malorie Black man.

    This book didn't exactly ruin my favourite book for me, because I didn't have a favourite book when I read it. But what this book has done is change the whole point of story telling for me.

    When I was younger I always thought writing a good piece of literature was done my using lots of fancy words that no one knows the meaning of and giving your characters amazing names, abilities and basically making them some kind of 'superhuman'.

    But after I read Noughts and Crosses I realised that everyday words are just as effective as fancy ones. And characters should be normal, because we can relate to them more. It's the plot that should be complex, with suspense that keeps you on the edge of your seat and thrills that leave your heart thumping even after you've closed the book.

    Above all, this book took me firmly by the hand, turned me around, saying, "Look, you really don't wanna spend your whole life fantasising about things that ain't gonna happen. Get on with your life, because stuff does happen to you. Stuff that matters."

    That's when I grew up, when I realised that I have a future, and I don't need to be the next Hermione Granger or the second Super Woman to make something of myself.

    Yeah, I know; I've rambled and gone off the point. Sorry.

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    Best book I ever read was a book we had to read for school, but I've never read anything which ticks all the boxes like "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.

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    Platinum Member Snny's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Silverbirch
    Best book I ever read was a book we had to read for school, but I've never read anything which ticks all the boxes like "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
    This. I love Harper Lee.
    Last edited by Snny; 02-26-2013 at 12:27 AM.

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    Isn't she great. Did you know that the boy in the book who Scout played with was genuinely Truman Capote when he was a kid?

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    Platinum Member MasterPo's Avatar
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    I am not a fan of the great literature espoused by conventional society, probably because I lack word development and/or imagination. Having said, that I do enjoy the works of various outdoor writers and truly appreciate the tone of a common language or terminology if you will.

    Skeeter Skelton. I find extreme comfort in the man's words and his life on the American southwestern border.

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    Well, I think that when I read Wuthering Heights, it was like nothing I had ever read - it was as though I could feel the emotions of the characters.

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    Platinum Member Snny's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Silverbirch
    Isn't she great. Did you know that the boy in the book who Scout played with was genuinely Truman Capote when he was a kid?
    They were both childhood friends. Atticus Finch was also a parallel to her father. Even Boo Radley was a real person from their childhood.

    I tried to get into Wuthering Heights and had to do a huge college research paper on it. I really couldn't get into it.

    Personally for me, I am a George Orwell fan. His works are still in debates of what our modern society has become.

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    Funny isn't it Snny? I had raved about Wuthering Heights to somebody else I knew and she couldn't get into it either. For me though, I felt almost like I was in a dream-like state with that book. I was mesmerised.

    We had to read some Orwell at school, "Animal Farm" and "1984" but I didn't get into it the same way. I did LOVE "Catcher in the Rye" but nobody else in my class did. Many years later, I read "The Bell Jar" by Sylvia Plath which was similar in a lot of ways to "Catcher" but it was based on a young woman's experience of having a mental breakdown. I thought it was very good too.

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    Has anyone read "Rebecca" by Daphne Du Maurier? Great suspense!

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    The Gormenghast Trilogy by Mervyn Peake. These books contain some of the most descriptive and colorful prose I have ever had the pleasure of reading.

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