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Is Your Life In Crisis?

Excerpted from Welcome to Your Crisis: How to Use the Power of Crisis to Create the Life You Want By Laura Day This book is about starting new lives. Why do we start a new life? Because we are in crisis with our old life. Is your life in crisis? How would you know? I ask because our crises don't always present themselves as emergencies. We usually think of crisis in big, dramatic terms-even a major positive event in our

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Why Black Americans Still Don't Feel at Home

Excerpted from Yet A Stranger; Why Black Americans Still Don't Feel at Home By Deborah Mathis The flagrantly racist acts and policies that stain much of American history provide a certain service in that they are unambiguous. "Whites only" signs require no interpretation or discernment. However ridiculous and offensive the old-fashioned tactics and systems of racism were, they were at least straightforward. They were at least-and it pains me to apply this term to such e

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A Mess Sampler - Desks

Excerpted from A Perfect Mess: The Hidden Benefits of Disorder - How Crammed Closets, Cluttered Offices, and On-the-Fly Planning Make the World a Better Place By Eric Abrahamson, Ph.D., M.Ph., David H. Freedman Industrial psychologist Andrew DuBrin at the Rochester Institute of Technology has noted, "Whenever you see a photo of a powerful person, the person always has a clean work area." He's right, of course. A Fortune 500 CEO or a U.S. senator posing in front of a des

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The Art of Women, Age, and Power

Excerpted from The Mona Lisa Stratagem; The Art of Women, Age, and Power By Harriet Rubin Like Jackie, I found in all of this fecund history one singular source, a Godmother-the mother of all Godmothers. She has survived for over five hundred years looking not a day over thirty. She is ageless, timeless. She is French by citizenship (she resides in the Louvre Museum in Paris) but is Italian by birth-born in Florence in the sixteenth century, the time when Madonnas and t

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The Behaviors That Hold You Back - The Top 10 Killer Constraints

Excerpted from The Flip Side: Break Free of the Behaviors That Hold You Back By Flip Flippen We all have constraints that are potentially hurtful and sometimes dangerous. What about a parent who isn't nurturing enough to his or her children? Or a parent who is too nurturing and continues to enable inappropriate behavior by not setting adequate boundaries? What about a boss or a spouse who is defensive and not open to feedback? It is easy to minimize the threat that our

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Understanding the Four Fictions - The Power of Insight and Honesty

Excerpted from Living the Truth: Transform Your Life Through the Power of Insight and Honesty By Keith Ablow, M.D. If you were to tell someone the story of your life, would you be honest from start to finish? Or would there be gaping holes? Would there be chapters you would want to hide-not only from others but from yourself as well? Because we unconsciously (and even neurologically) treat the painful chapters of our lives as the enemy, nearly e

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Know that Authentic Confidence Attracts Success

Excerpted from Why Not You?: Twenty-eight Days to Authentic Confidence By Valorie Burton Authentic confidence is more than self-confidence. Self-confidence is about what you can do. Authentic confidence is about what God I can do through you, in you, and for you. It's important to possess self-confidence, build your skills, properly prepare to fulfill your dreams, and learn through experience and education. But these things aren't enough; they'l

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Identifying What Isn't Working

Excerpted from The Not So Big Life: Making Room for What Really Matters By Sarah Susanka The first step in implementing the blueprint for a Not So Big Life is to take a look at our lives to identify what stands in the way of living the way we'd like to be living. This isn't easy because it requires that we look objectively at many aspects of our daily life that we take entirely for granted. But this is the same process you would undertake if you

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Oh, Little Girl, Never Grow Up - The Women Who Made America Modern

Excerpted from Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and the Women Who Made America Modern By Joshua Zeitz Technically speaking, Colleen Moore wasn't the first actress to portray the flapper on-screen. In 1920, a small production company released an unmemorable film entitled, simply, The Flapper. "In some sections you may have to define the title" one trade journal advised potential distributors, "though its meaning is pretty generally known by now." &

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Childhood - Where's My Dad?

Excerpted from Human Moments: How to Find Meaning and Love in Your Everyday Life By Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. In the middle of the night, I heard a noise. I woke up and listened, and heard another noise, like a clank. It was dark out, but I had no idea what time it was. I was three years old, almost four. As I lay in bed, I continued to hear clanking sounds. I called out for my mother. In a moment, she appeared by my bedside. &

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Turn Your Emotions into Resolve - How to Say No

Excerpted from The Power of a Positive No: How to Say No and Still Get to Yes By William L. Ury, Ph.D. Once you have clarified your intention, it is time to give it energy. That energy can come from your emotions, properly harnessed. In addition to serving as warning signals of unmet needs, emotions play another critical function: they provide fuel for action. They impel us to take appropriate action to protect our core interests, giving us courage and resolve. As champ

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Observing & Creativity

Excerpted from Digging Deep: Unearthing Your Creative Roots Through Gardening By Fran Sorin Observing is very simply the act of consciously attending to or making note of something. In the fast-paced world we inhabit in the twenty-first century, so many of us move through our days as if blindfolded. We race from one item on our to-do list to the next, hurriedly trying to get it all done better and quicker, barely taking notice of that which is around us. It is not our f

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The Virtues of Character

Excerpted from The Force of Character: And the Lasting Life By James Hillman, Ph.D. Besides giving aging its value and its meaning, character has other virtues. We can lay these out quite succinctly, circumscribing the idea of character. 1. The idea of character depends on the archetypal notion of difference. Character is defined in the simplest dictionary form as "any observable mark, quality or property by which anything, person, species or ev

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Learn Self-Love

Excerpted from All the Joy You Can Stand: 101 Sacred Power Principles for Making Joy Real in Your Life By Debrena Jackson Gandy Fourteen floors above Madison Avenue, I was sitting in the lounge at the lovely Gazelle Day Spa in Manhattan, New York, leading a sacred pampering seminar for some of the spas VIP clientele. About halfway through the seminar, Cherie, one of the patrons, walked in and sat down to join the discussion. We were in the midst of discussing the signs

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Compassion for Others

Excerpted from You Can Change Your Life... Any Time You Want: An Inspirational Guide to Success By Robin Sieger Imagine you go to a party. You are mingling with a number of guests, some of whom you think look quite interesting and would like to talk to, and one or two you think you must avoid like the plague - they look like they are going to bore you to death. The host comes across to introduce you to somebody you thought would bore you to death. You have prejudged the

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A Recipe for Rapport

Excerpted from Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships By Daniel Goleman, Ph.D. A psychotherapy session is well underway. The psychiatrist sits in a wooden armchair, stiffly formal in manner. His patient slumps on a leather couch, her very air one of defeat. They are not on the same wavelength. The psychiatrist has made a therapeutic gaffe, an off-kilter interpretation of what the patient has just said. He offers an apology:

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Taking Measure

Excerpted from Stand For Something: The Battle for America's Soul By John Kasich I grew up in a small Pennsylvania town outside Pittsburgh called McKees Rocks, the kind of place where hard work was often its own reward, and where everyone knew most everyone else. My father was a mail carrier. My mother also worked for the post office, sorting mail. Between the two of them, and the connections they established, it sometimes seemed I couldn't cros

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The Organizing Principle: The Key to Straightening Things Out

Excerpted from Getting Organized: The Easy Way to Put Your Life in Order By Stephanie Winston All concepts of order, from the simplest system of closet arrangement to the most complex computer technology, share one essential characteristic: an organizing principle. The idea behind the organizing principle is that any intellectual or practical system always contains a central pole, an essential priority, around which all the other components group themselves.

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740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building

Excerpted from 740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building By Michael Gross Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg refers to her maternal great-grandfather as Grampy Lee. "Grumpy" Lee would be more apt. A portly, gruff man who chomped a dozen cheap cigars a day, he didn't speak to his wife for years, disinherited several grandchildren, and died with no company but his Oriental manservant. Today, James Thomas Aloysius Lee is best known, i

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Perfect Skin

Excerpted from The Body Project: An Intimate History of American Girls By Joan Jacobs Brumberg In 1899, a Philadelphia pediatrician was called to the home of a seventeen-year-old patient who was having "an hysterical attack." Dr. Edwin Rosenthal had seen "Miss E.L." before, because she suffered from headaches and irregular periods. But this time the young woman, who was studying to be a teacher, was agitated and sobbing about her skin. She had acne on each cheek and cla

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The Worst Ways to Handle Worry

Excerpted from The Worry Cure: Seven Steps to Stop Worry from Stopping You By Robert L. Leahy, Ph.D. Most worriers have heard this advice from well-meaning friends or even well-meaning therapists. You might-if you are really lucky-feel better for about ten minutes. Trying to be more positive is a good idea at times, but as a worrier, you are actually afraid of being more positive. Telling you to "think positively" is like telling someone who has

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Suffer Not a Woman to Speak

Excerpted from A History of Women in America By Carol Hymowitz, Michaele Weissman No body of ideas had a greater influence on American colonials than did Protestant theology. Some Catholics and Jews lived in early America, but most colonials identified with one or another Protestant sect. While religious practices and the degree of religious intensity varied from region to region, it is safe to say that religious beliefs were a mainstay of most colonials' lives. &

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Reinventing Womanhood - Coming of Age with Hillary's Class

Excerpted from Rebels in White Gloves: Coming of Age with Hillary's Class - Wellesley '69 By Miriam Horn Of all the revolutions made by the members of the class of '69, none has been more radical than their wholesale entry into the professional world. Though many of the women had experimented with political activity in the sixties movements, work would set them, unlike any previous generation of women, firmly within the public sphere. Work promi

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For the Time Being

Excerpted from For the Time Being By Annie Dillard In 135 C.E., the Romans killed Rabbi Akiva for teaching Torah. They killed him by flaying his skin and stripping his bones with currycombs. He was eighty-five years old. A Roman currycomb in those days was an iron scraper; its blunt teeth combed mud and burrs from horsehair. To flay someone-an unusual torture-the wielder had to bear down. Perhaps the skin and muscles of an old scholar are comparatively loose.

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Love It or Leave It

Excerpted from Don't Get Too Comfortable By David Rakoff COINCIDENTALLY, CANADIAN - BORN newscaster Peter Jennings also became a citizen around the same time, after almost forty years in the United States. According to the papers, his swearing in took place in a swanky Manhattan courthouse. I, on the other hand, am forced to catch the 6:55 a.m. train to Hempstead, Long Island. My friend Sarah, a self-described civics nerd, very sweetly agrees to come with me. She is a g

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